Moka Pot Brewing Method

How To Make Moka Pot Coffee

When it comes to Moka Pots, many people have a misconception. They think Moka pot coffee is bitter. This makes Moka pot an inferior pick over specialty coffee brews. But in reality, Moka Pots can be used to brew delicious cups of coffee that has a sweet taste. You only need the right recipe. Whether you are a professional barista or a novice coffee drinker, this guide will help you prepare a Moka pot coffee. 

What Are The Origin Of The Moka Pot?

Alfonso Bialetti.jpg
Pubblico dominio, Collegamento

Moka Pot is mostly popular in Italy. If you visit an Italian household, you will find they are using Moka Pots to brew coffee in their homes. Back in 1933, The Moka Pot was first put together by Luigi De Ponti for Alfonso Bialetti.  

Some households use the Moka Pot as a substitute for expensive Espresso Makers. Despite their origin in Italy, the Moka pot found its way to many countries across Europe, North America, North Africa, and some parts of Asia. 

Currently, many brands make Moka pots. But the pioneer of Moka pots, Bialetti, still is the popular pick. Their most popular model is the Bialetti Express

What Features Should You Look For When Buying A Moka Pot?

When choosing a Moka Pot, make sure your Moka Pot has a stainless steel or aluminum body. It allows the Moka pot to withstand the heat from the stove and resist rust. The Moka pot has a coffee basket that sits above the water chamber. 

Stainless Steel has many advantages. If you are looking for something durable and easy to use, go with a stainless steel Moka pot. Stainless Steel has another advantage. Not all-electric, and induction stoves are compatible with aluminum, but they are with stainless steel. 

There are tiny holes in the coffee basket. This allows the steam to rise from below and fuse with the coffee grounds. The steam then cools downs and extracts the aroma, oil, and acids from the coffee grounds. The steam slowly drips down to the water chamber. 

What You Need To Make Coffee In A Moka Pot

  • Coffee – Medium Grind coffee is ideal for Moka pot. Use the same coffee grounds as you would make a drip coffee or a pour-over coffee. 
  • Moka Pot – As mentioned above, stainless steel Moka pots are the best ones in the market. They do not rust and distribute the heat evenly. Moreover, they are compatible with all inductive and electric stoves. 
Bialetti Moka Express Stovetop Coffee Maker, 3-Cup, Aluminium
Primula Aluminum Espresso Maker, 3 Cups
Classic Stovetop Espresso Maker for Great Flavored Strong Espresso, Classic Italian Style 3 Espresso Cup Moka Pot, Makes Delicious Coffee, Easy to Operate & Quick Cleanup Pot - by Zulay Kitchen
Bellemain Stovetop Espresso Maker Moka Pot (Black, 9 Cup)
Bialetti Moka Express Stovetop Coffee Maker, 3-Cup, Aluminium
Primula Aluminum Espresso Maker, 3 Cups
Classic Stovetop Espresso Maker for Great Flavored Strong Espresso, Classic Italian Style 3 Espresso Cup Moka Pot, Makes Delicious Coffee, Easy to Operate & Quick Cleanup Pot - by Zulay Kitchen
Bellemain Stovetop Espresso Maker Moka Pot (Black, 9 Cup)
Bialetti Moka Express Stovetop Coffee Maker, 3-Cup, Aluminium
Bialetti Moka Express Stovetop Coffee Maker, 3-Cup, Aluminium
Primula Aluminum Espresso Maker, 3 Cups
Primula Aluminum Espresso Maker, 3 Cups
Classic Stovetop Espresso Maker for Great Flavored Strong Espresso, Classic Italian Style 3 Espresso Cup Moka Pot, Makes Delicious Coffee, Easy to Operate & Quick Cleanup Pot - by Zulay Kitchen
Classic Stovetop Espresso Maker for Great Flavored Strong Espresso, Classic Italian Style 3 Espresso Cup Moka Pot, Makes Delicious Coffee, Easy to Operate & Quick Cleanup Pot - by Zulay Kitchen
Bellemain Stovetop Espresso Maker Moka Pot (Black, 9 Cup)
Bellemain Stovetop Espresso Maker Moka Pot (Black, 9 Cup)

Last update on 2021-03-02 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Preparation

Before you start the brewing, make sure you have freshly ground coffee at your disposal. Grind 20-25 grams of coffee beans at a medium grind. 

Brewing Coffee In A Moka Pot 

Preheat the Water – Use a separate kettle to heat water. When the water reaches the boiling point, remove the kettle. Let it sit and cool down for a bit. If you use the water straight out of the stove, it might overheat the Moka pot and extract a metallic taste. 

Hario Gooseneck Coffee Kettle 'Buono', Stovetop, 1.2L, Stainless Steel, Silver
  • Prepare Coffee Ground – To prepare a delicious cup of coffee with the Moka pot, you need to use the coffee ground as light as table salt. How much should you add to the Moka pot at a time? Well, adding 15-17 grams will fill up your Moka Pot. But it depends on the Moka pot you are using. Check the user manual to learn more about your Moka Pot.  
Coffee Grind Levels e1600970422513 Image

Add Water – Now, it is time to add the warm water. Keep on pouring the water until you hit the line at the bottom of the Moka pot.

Moka Pot Full Of Water Image

Insert the Filter Basket – Now, take the filter basket, and insert it into the Moka pot’s bottom. 

Moka Pot Filter Image

Add Coffee Ground – Add the freshly grounded coffee to the filter basket. Make sure the coffee grounds do not take a pyramid shape. Use your finger to level the surface. Brush off any coffee ground sitting on the edge of the filter basket. 

Moka Pot Full Of Coffee Grounds Image

Assemble the Moka Pot – Now, take the top and bottom parts of the Moka pot, and screw them together. Use hot pads if you have to. While assembling the Moka pot, make sure you do not overtighten the assembly.  

Assembling Moka Pot Image
  • Place on the Stove – Keep the top lid open, and place the Moka pot on a stove. Keep the stove on moderate heat, and make sure the pot’s handle isn’t subject to the heat. As the brew starts to heat up, the coffee will start to come out from the top. You will hear a puffing sound when that happens. The brew will have a rich brown color at the start. With time, the color will lighten up. 

 

Moka Pot Coffee Coming Out Image
  • Remove the Pot Keep the Moka pot on top of the stove until the brew reaches a yellow-honey color. When it does, remove it from the heat source. The brewing is done now. Close the lid, and immediately place the Moka pot under a cold water stream. You can also place a chilled towel under the Moka pot. The purpose of doing so is to stop the Moka pot from releasing its metallic taste. 

 

Moka Pot brewed

Serving Your Moka Pot Coffee

After the Moka pot has cooled down, open the lid. If the brew has stopped bubbling out, the brew is ready to serve. You can serve the coffee directly from the Moka pot. If you want to dilute the taste of the brew, add some water. 

Recommended Moka Pot Coffee Makers

Last update on 2021-03-03 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Conclusion

When you learn how to brew with a Moka Pot, you must also learn how to clean it once the brew is done. This way, your brewing tools will be ready for the next brew. If you keep your Moka pot untidy, it may rust, and the steel might start to decay. 

After your brew is done, wait for the Moka pot to cool down before you clean it. When the pot has cooled down, dismantle the Moka pot. Then manually scrape the grinds out of the filter basket. Every month, you should do a deep cleansing. To do so, remove the top filter, and gasket. 

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