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What Is The Difference Between Single Origin and Blend Coffee?

Coffee 101: Single Origin and Blend Coffee

Single Origin and Blend Coffee are vastly different from one another. Single Origin coffee has an unaltered flavor profile as it uses coffee beans from the same place. On the other hand, Blend Coffee fuses either complementing or contrasting coffee beans to develop a unique tasting coffee recipe. 

Single Origin Coffee doesn’t alter the taste. So if you want to explore the core flavors of coffee from around the world, you can go on a single-origin coffee tasting spree. However, if you need coffee before going to work or coming back home after a tiring day, you are better off with blend coffee, as they offer a well-rounded, rich flavor. 

What Is Single-Origin Coffee? 

As the name suggests, Single-Origin coffee refers to coffee sourced from a single producer, a single crop variety, or a single geographic region in the world. But why is it important? Well, as it doesn’t mix multiple coffee beans with diverse origins, the taste stays pure. 

But some argue that the most important aspect of single-origin coffee is, the consumer can trace back its origin. Brazil, Vietnam, and Colombia are the top three coffee producers in the world. But true coffee lovers are aware of the slight difference in taste and flavor from these different producers.

Estate coffee is one type of Single-Origin Coffee, which refers to coffee grown on a farm. The farm can vary in sizes, but it ranges from hundreds of acres to thousands of miles. Multiple farms can be put together and made to follow the same cultivation methods to grow a single-origin coffee. Starbucks, the most popular global coffee chain, has its coffee estate in the Philippines. 

Another method of growing single-origin coffee is by micro-lot farming. This coffee cultivation form is used to grow specialty coffee, one of the most premium quality coffee markets. 

Examples Of Single-Origin Coffees

Peet's Coffee Single Origin Colombia, Dark Roast Ground Coffee, 18 oz
Two Volcanoes Coffee - Gourmet Guatemala Whole Bean Medium Roast Single-Origin Coffee. 1 lb
Guatemala Coffee, Antigua, Whole Bean, Medium Roast, Single Origin, Fresh Roasted, 16-ounces
Cuvée Whole Bean Coffee, Colombia Single Origin Medium Roast, Direct Trade, 12 Ounce
Peet's Coffee Single Origin Colombia, Dark Roast Ground Coffee, 18 oz
Two Volcanoes Coffee - Gourmet Guatemala Whole Bean Medium Roast Single-Origin Coffee. 1 lb
Guatemala Coffee, Antigua, Whole Bean, Medium Roast, Single Origin, Fresh Roasted, 16-ounces
Cuvée Whole Bean Coffee, Colombia Single Origin Medium Roast, Direct Trade, 12 Ounce
Peet's Coffee Single Origin Colombia, Dark Roast Ground Coffee, 18 oz
Peet's Coffee Single Origin Colombia, Dark Roast Ground Coffee, 18 oz
Two Volcanoes Coffee - Gourmet Guatemala Whole Bean Medium Roast Single-Origin Coffee. 1 lb
Two Volcanoes Coffee - Gourmet Guatemala Whole Bean Medium Roast Single-Origin Coffee. 1 lb
Guatemala Coffee, Antigua, Whole Bean, Medium Roast, Single Origin, Fresh Roasted, 16-ounces
Guatemala Coffee, Antigua, Whole Bean, Medium Roast, Single Origin, Fresh Roasted, 16-ounces
Cuvée Whole Bean Coffee, Colombia Single Origin Medium Roast, Direct Trade, 12 Ounce
Cuvée Whole Bean Coffee, Colombia Single Origin Medium Roast, Direct Trade, 12 Ounce
Also See:  What Is Decaf Coffee? Is Decaf Good For You?

Last update on 2021-06-20 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

What Are Coffee Blends? 

Coffee Blends have multiple meanings. It can either refer to a mixture of coffee beans that come from diverse producers. The diverse producers don’t need to have some similar features; they might not have any. The purpose of coffee blends is to give birth to a compound taste by mixing diverse coffee grounds.

You might be wondering whether the blending is done before the roasting or after it is done? Well, it can be done either way. Often light flavored coffee is mixed with coffee with high citrus acidity. Similarly, mild coffee is mixed with coffee with a smooth, velvety aftertaste. 

Think of coffee blending as color blending by an artist. There are only a few pure colors. But an artist can mix them in any order he wishes to create just the right color he wants to use for his next masterpiece. Coffee Blending is just like that. 

By mixing different pure coffee beans, coffee makers can produce a custom flavor that caters to the individual taste preferences. If we didn’t blend coffee, we would be limited to the few pure coffee flavors naturally available. 

Examples Of Blend Coffee

Starbucks Medium Roast Ground Coffee — House Blend — 100% Arabica — 1 bag (20 oz.)
Peet's Coffee Major Dickason's Blend, Dark Roast Ground Coffee, 18 Oz
New England Coffee New England Breakfast Blend, Medium Roast Ground Coffee, 12 Ounce (1 Count) Bag
Seattle's Best Coffee Henry's Blend Dark Roast Ground Coffee, 12 Ounce (Pack of 1)
Starbucks Medium Roast Ground Coffee — House Blend — 100% Arabica — 1 bag (20 oz.)
Peet's Coffee Major Dickason's Blend, Dark Roast Ground Coffee, 18 Oz
New England Coffee New England Breakfast Blend, Medium Roast Ground Coffee, 12 Ounce (1 Count) Bag
Seattle's Best Coffee Henry's Blend Dark Roast Ground Coffee, 12 Ounce (Pack of 1)
Starbucks Medium Roast Ground Coffee — House Blend — 100% Arabica — 1 bag (20 oz.)
Starbucks Medium Roast Ground Coffee — House Blend — 100% Arabica — 1 bag (20 oz.)
Peet's Coffee Major Dickason's Blend, Dark Roast Ground Coffee, 18 Oz
Peet's Coffee Major Dickason's Blend, Dark Roast Ground Coffee, 18 Oz
New England Coffee New England Breakfast Blend, Medium Roast Ground Coffee, 12 Ounce (1 Count) Bag
New England Coffee New England Breakfast Blend, Medium Roast Ground Coffee, 12 Ounce (1 Count) Bag
Seattle's Best Coffee Henry's Blend Dark Roast Ground Coffee, 12 Ounce (Pack of 1)
Seattle's Best Coffee Henry's Blend Dark Roast Ground Coffee, 12 Ounce (Pack of 1)
Also See:  How Do We Get Coffee – Seed to Cup

Last update on 2021-06-20 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Single Origin VS Blend Coffee 

In terms of its composition, Single-Origin Coffee refers to coffee that has been manufactured by a single farm, in a certain geographic location, and under a specific atmosphere. On the other hand, Blend Coffee refers to a fine mixture of single-origin coffee. This way, coffee producers can bring out the best of single-origin coffee and offer a much richer and complex coffee flavor.

Even if two batches of coffee grounds are from the same country, they don’t need to be the same single-origin coffee. Many micro factors determine the final flavor of the coffee. For instance, Columbia has three distinct geographic locations where most coffee comes from; it is referred to as the Coffee Triangle. 

Even though they are nearby, it is not necessary that they can all be labeled under one single-origin coffee brand. The differences in soil condition, precipitation, harvesting methods, water, minerals, and harvesting time all play a role in determining the coffee beans’ final taste.  

Coffee Roasters have different recipes for Blend Coffee. Sometimes they will spend weeks or even months before coming up with a coffee blend recipe that they are fully satisfied with. Some roasters often stick to a formula that mixes similar tasting coffee. Single Origin coffee that complements each other can be mixed to brew a flavor with a much stronger core flavor. 

But roasters often blend coffee beans that do not taste the same at all. This mixing helps them achieve a unique contrasting coffee flavor. However, you will find many coffee roasters that use artificial flavoring to get the desired taste.

Also See:  Drinking Coffee: What are the best practices?

 Even if a Coffee Roaster comes up with a groundbreaking coffee blend that caters to millions of coffee lovers, it might not taste the same after the second brew. Coffee is grown in batches. Depending on the soil properties, the climate, how they have been stored and dried, the same single-origin coffee can taste quite different from the next harvest. 

Roaster doesn’t always do coffee blends to bring out a unique flavor. Often they do it to keep their coffee cheap so that more people can afford a few cups each day. 

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Which Is Right For You? 

There is a high chance of whether you get your coffee from a shop or pick them up from a retailer’s shelves; it will be a coffee blend. But if you want to brew the coffee yourself, you will also find single-origin coffee pretty easily on the market. 

According to a report, it was found that 12 ounces of coffee from Starbucks had twice the caffeine content than a cup from Dunkin’s Coffee. It is possible because Starbucks uses a blend of Robusta and Arabica coffee beans. The only way Starbucks can keep on offering coffee that tastes the same is by sticking to a single coffee blend recipe. 

So if you are wondering whether you should pick Single Origin Coffee or Blend Coffee, the answers solely depend on you. Go with a flavor that most appeals to your taste buds and which you love drinking. 

Conclusion

So, we hope now you have no confusion regarding Single Origin Coffee and Blend Coffee. If you have a recipe for blend coffee you want to share, leave a comment below. 

And if you are still wondering which one is better, single-origin coffee or blend coffee, let us make it easier for you. Neither has any bad effects on your body. So as long as you pick the one you like drinking, you are doing yourself a favor. 

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